Sunday, March 6, 2011

The Shias Of Sri Lanka – A Tentative Beginning.

Muslims in Sri Lanka number about 2 million, 10%, concentrated mostly in the east of this exotic island. There was a time when Muslims dominated business and commerce, especially in Jaffna, but war by LTTE saw atrocities against them. Scores of Muslims were gathered in mosques and grenades thrown at them; those that survived had their throats slit. So they scattered, impoverished, leaving behind everything they owned. Almost every Muslim I met expressed happiness and satisfaction with the defeat of LTTE.

The Shias of Sri Lanka number no more than about 2,000, concentrated mostly in the east of the country around Walachil and Calcuda in Batticaloa District; there are also some in Kandy and in Noorelia as well. None of these were born into Shiaism, but have reverted after reasoning and research, especially after the 1979 Islamic revolution in Iran. Though mainstream Shaafi Muslim populace of Sri Lanka is ripe for accepting madhab of Ahlebeit (A), progress has been tentative at best due to a host of reasons, mainly lack of support from Shia countries and institutes that matter in these field.

My contact point in Sri Lanka is Az Zahra Foundation headed by Sister Zaveeni and her husband Haaris Jamil, both committed to the service of humanity and very strong in their love for Ahlebeit (A). I am in Sri Lanka to oversee relief aid to flood victims of devastating floods in eastern part of the country. This will be done through Az Zahra Foundation, for they have humanitarian aid experience and credibility of several years.

Day one takes me to outskirts of Colombo, to Duwatta where many marginalized Muslims live in shacks that flood every time it rains, not unlike Govendhi and Malaad slums of Mumbai. Residents of this area are either new reverts to Shia Islam or almost there, thanks to the efforts of Az Zahra Foundation. Slowly, surely, they are guided along to the right path and gather at the Jalil residence for Dua e Tawwasul and Komail.

We are off to Walachil early next morning to survey flood damage, a distance of about 200 miles. For a ‘poor’ country, Sri Lankan roads are remarkably good and well maintained, at least compared to other ‘poor’ Southeast Asian countries. Remarkable also, is absence of filth and evil smells I have come across major urban cities of India. Even in the slums of stark poor Duwatta, there is semblance of order and cleanliness, unpolluted by the ghastly, revolting gutter smells of Govendhi or Malaad of Mumbai perhaps. An argument can be made regarding the imbalance (and management) of populations between the two; Mumbai’s 14 million is almost two thirds the whole of Sri Lanka’s 21 million, true; but comparing the economies and GDP of the city and country blows this argument away.

The scenery along the way is fantastic; that of rolling meadows and thick forests dotted with small towns and villages offering an array of fruits. It is good this is not summertime, so tropical fruits like mangoes, jack fruits etc are absent, else I would have been delirious in fruit frenzy that my hosts would probably have found peculiar. Nevertheless, yummy pineapples abound and some soursop (ramfur?); this fruit was no more than 10 cents for a healthy piece not too long ago. Prices have shot up 30 times since its cancer fighting benefits have come to light.

We get lost as we near Walachil some 6 hours later and it takes some frantic calls to get us guided to a guest house at a dairy farm. This area was out of bounds and very dangerous not too long ago under the LTTE. We are in an area rich with cattle farming and management; one company has a charming bungalow that it rents out to visitors. Modern and clean with power, even air conditioners, in the middle of nowhere, this is a pleasant surprise. We lunch on delicious fish curry that is a delight. This is a blessing throughout my stay in Sri Lanka, excellent seafood that is spiced just right. I am to be treated on fish head curry and massive prawns later on at the Jamil residence, a culinary experience that I am hard pressed to equate in the past, ever.

We then survey the damaged homes, a mission most depressing and unpleasant. As with other world areas where CAI has helped the unfortunate, I get a lot of requests from poor people appealing for home building aid. Yes, some homes are in pitiful conditions, but my mandate and budget are constrained for flood victims only; unfortunately, I have to disappoint. 12 homes within CAI budget are identified for repair / rebuilding. However, there is chorus appeal for replacement of school supplies lost in the flood from needy students. These are about 500 students that have lost school books and supplies, are finding it very difficult to continue studies without them. CAI will work towards replacing these for the most poor; soon insha’Allah.

At night, after meeting local leaders in a makeshift mosque (the community lack a mosque, Husseinya or community center) and seafood dinner, we retire as we have further home inspections and a long journey back to Colombo next day. In the morning, we visit a hauza, Man Bul Huda, a massive boarding school donated by foreign donors; Jaaferi school of thought is taught here, smack in the middle of a large Wahabi community. After another seafood lunch, we return to Colombo later in the day, stopping for a light non seafood dinner. I am happy to observe most restaurants in Colombo are Muslim owned with prayer rooms for both sexes in almost all of them.

My last day in Colombo is spent visiting a boy’s orphanage that was formed and donated by an Iraqi almost 50 years ago. I spent a delightful few hours at dinner with the Jalil family that night; Sister Zaveena, Brother Haaris, their daughter Amina and granddaughter Aariana, their son Ashique and his fiancée Zainab. My trip to Sri Lanka would not have been so comfortable and memorial without the kindness and generosity of this family for which I will ever be thankful. CAI will, in the future insha’Allah, partner with Az Zahra Foundation in service of humanity for Allah’s (S) pleasure.

I return to India next day without incident, no flight delays, crows crapping good luck on me or rickshaw drivers offering worldly pleasures.

View photos here.

5 comments:

Hafis said...

This post will give real experiences to the readers. And I felt good and happy when I read too.

But I don’t know why did you avoid mention our Association “Ittihad Islamic Friendship Association for devotees of Ahlul Bait(as)”.

However, this is my duty to explain that, there are good amount of Shia people in Valaichenai area of Batticaloa District in Eastern province of Sri Lanka. They are converted from Shafi School of thoughts to Ja’fari School of thoughts by the service of Manbaul Huda Arabic College that was founded by Moulavi Asheikh Mohamed Ishaq who is the first Sri Lankan Shia person converted from Sunni by the influence of Islamic Revolution of Iran. And he is founder of our association too.

When we – our association – were informed about your arrival to our place, we have arranged accommodation for your residents and organized an immediate meeting to introduce our association and to discuss with you about our activities. Also we have gained good ideas from your opinions. Thanks.

This association is run by my leadership and we have a director board from 14 active members and a public committee with more than 50 members. The all members of association are graduated from Manbaul Huda Arabic College and they are working in many governmental, nongovernmental and individual professions and businesses. And all of them committed to the service of humanity and strong in their love for Ahlul bait (as).

We have done many projects successfully such as digging wells and giving foods for poor Muslims, and distributing learning materials to Muslim children, organizing education, cultural, and social services and workshops etc. People and associations from Kuwait and Iran donate to our projects.

It was a blessed chance that our members received and welcomed you very much and they have prepared what you have requested. Al-Hamdu Lillah.

Moreover, there are some Shia associations, organizations and foundations in Sri Lanka who are working in many field for the service of followers of Ahlul Bait (as). We believe that we are the leading association in all of them.

Thank you.

Mohamed Reza said...

A very good article.But there is a mistake in population of shias in Srilanka.According to the new research there are about 17000 strong shia muslims and produce 1%of muslim population.And almost all the shias in Srilanka are belonging to jafari fiqh,twelver branch.
And there are many sufi sunni muslims who give strength for our works.

Basheer Ali said...

Salaam to everyone. Ramadhan Mubarak to all of you. I am new in the city and just came from Pakistan. Will appreciate if someone can give me contact details of Shia mosque or gathering place so I can attend.

Email address basheerali14@gmail.com
Cell 0094777724441

peternott goodwill said...

Shia is not Muslim even though their attire looks like also Bhoras are the same so do not mislead us. Nowadays shias are understood as non-Muslim such as ahmadiya qadiyani. So all right thinking Muslims should keep away from such corrupt shiasm. May Allaah protects all the Muslims from hell fire.

Mohamed Akram Mohamed Anfas said...

Shiias are kafirs. Murthadh. And they are out of Islam's principal. Keep on eye with thier activities in Sri Lanka. Dangerous people they will accompany the innocents to the Jahannam.